Wordless Wednesday

Submitted by:  Judy V., Master Gardener since 20007

SaveSave

SaveSave

Advertisements
Posted in Photography, Wordless Wednesday | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Invasive Crazy Snake Worm

This worm, aka Asian Jumping Worm (Amynthas aigrestis), has been identified in Durham, NH, in the woods, flowerbeds, raised beds, and under a tarp next to the woods. There have been self-reported sightings in other Durham locations, Dover, Lee, and Elliot, Maine.

These invasive worms prefer forest floors, but also devour compost, and wood mulches of all types. You may notice what resembles coffee grounds on top of mulch, the sidewalk, or in gravel.

Jumping worms are approximately 3-7″ long, are dark brown to gray in color, have a light grayish tan band that goes completely around the body, and writhes like a snake when you try to pick it up.

It’s readily identified in the fall when the worms are in the adult phase and laying eggs. In the spring, they look like regular little worms.

So what do you do after you freak out? After all, you thought earthworms were your friends.

Here in New Hampshire, you can take the worms to the UNH Anthropod Identification Center, Spaulding Building, 28 B for identification. For $5, the specimen can be identified. Here is the link to the submission form.

These invasive worms have become a national problem. Originally, they came from Asia in potted plants and have wormed their way up from the South to the Great Lakes Region, Vermont, and now the rest of New England.

Jumping worms can reproduce without fertilization, and one individual worm can launch an invasion in your woods, garden, or flowerbed. The worms die when the weather turns cooler but leave cocoons loaded with eggs that live through the winter to rise again in the spring.

Compost and potted plants have been known to spread them. When you bring new plants home, examine the soil they are in before planting and when you buy compost consider purchasing from a source that heats the compost to kill pathogens.

Questions? Contact your local Cooperative Extension office. Don’t know where your local office is? No problem.

Just enter your zip code on www.gardeningknowhow.com/extension-search, and contact information will be provided.

Submitted by: Jean O., MG since 2009, and Judy V., MG since 2007

——

Informational Sources:

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Posted in Gardening | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Wordless Wednesday

Submitted by: Jon B, MG since 1996

SaveSave

SaveSave

Posted in Photography, Wordless Wednesday | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Caterpillar Lab

Bedrock Garden Open House
September 16 and 17

Caterpillar Lab Sunday 1-4

Want to learn about caterpillars, with their extensive diversity, distinctive beauty, and fascinating metamorphosis? The Caterpillar Lab visits Bedrock Gardens, with its awe-inspiring presentations, as seen at the Boston Museum of Science and the Boston Children’s Museum. Here is a review. It is a magical educational show. No additional cost except the donation to the garden on admission.

Also, there will be music from 12–2 pm on Saturday by The Jazz Lab.

Picture

​There will be a free Tour of the Garden  held at 10:30 and at 1:00  on Saturday (only), led by an experienced and knowledgeable garden guide and plant person. A great way to learn about the garden.

There also will be a free Garden Art Tour held  at 1 pm on both Sat and Sun covering an overview of Jill Nooney’s garden sculptures, including inspirations, materials used, recurring themes, some quotes from the artist, and a focused look at more than 30 individual pieces throughout the garden.​

Note: the Open House is Saturday 10–4, and Sunday 10–4. This Caterpillar Lab event is on Sunday 1–4pm only.

On Saturday and Sunday, boxed picnic lunches can be pre-ordered. Details and menu here.

We want to acknowledge and thank   Eldredge Lumber & Hardware  and Atlantic Design Center for underwriting this program.

Reposted from Bedrock Gardens website.


SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Posted in Gardening | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Wordless Wednesday

Submitted by:  Debby B., MG since 2010

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Posted in Photography, Wordless Wednesday | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

I ❤️ Bumblebees

Advice for gardening with pollinators from a fellow MG in Exeter.

Breaking New Ground in Zone 5

I make a concerted effort to attract bees and other pollinators to our garden. This year, I spent a little more time trying to entice bumblebees to nest in the yard. I already supply a continuous food source during the growing season but I read up on what a bumblebee needs for a nest.

I saved dried leaves and grass, and in a corner behind a fence where the soil is dry and shady, I piled the grass clippings and leaves early in the spring. And, lo and behold, one day I watched a large bumblebee arrived, zigging here and there, flying around and around the leaves and fence for a couple of days in the cool spring. At first I thought it may be a carpenter bee attracted to the wood fence but, no, this plump bumblebee was eventually crawling around the leaves. She was a bumblebee queen!

She…

View original post 325 more words

Posted in Gardening | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday

Submitted by:  Jon B., MG since 1996

SaveSave

Posted in Photography, Wordless Wednesday | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment